Sacred Everyday

Reading through ‘The Liturgy of the Ordinary’ as a congregation.


I do not make my bed. Most mornings I’m out of bed at 5am and getting ready for work. This is a full hour or more before my wife needs to wake for her work. It would make very little sense for me to attempt to make the bed with her still dead asleep in it. But making the bed is not Tish Warren’s point in chapter two of Liturgy of the Ordinary. Rather she puts forward a challenge, one that I have been growing more and more familiar...

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My bed is a low profile twin from Ikea that I bought when I gladly downsized to make room for my Aunt who was my housemate and companion for the last five years of her life. Every morning when I get out of bed I think about how, after two years, it is high time I return to my real bedroom and set up my real bed where I can stretch out fully without hitting up against a wall. I will retrieve the down quilt from storage and go back to...

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This week’s chapter from Liturgy of the Ordinary by Tish Warren has a title I was excited to write about: “Making the Bed.” Before I read it, I thought I could use this space to talk about how I got a set of new bedding that makes me feel like a grown up, and how the habit of making my bed does help me feel more organized and confident as I go about my day. Then I read the chapter. My hopeful (and a little self-righteous) expectations...

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As a child, we didn’t have air conditioning.  In Oregon that elicits a shrug, but in the Midwest, Summer’s were brutal.  My parent’s solution was to move my brother and I into the den where a lone window unit would struggle against the Oklahoma heat.  Waking in Summer for me would be disorienting and disjointed.   My brother would be on floor next to me rather than an arm dangling from the top bunk.  No superhero...

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Your body is not just a suitcase that carries your soul around. Your body is not an automated shell that your brain tells what to do like a computer inside a robot. Your body informs your experience and shapes your behavior.  Much of what you think, or even believe, about the world is because of the interactions of your body.   Here is the audio podcast of this sermon: (13 min) ...

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A reflection on Liturgy of the Ordinary: Sacred Practices in Everyday Life, by Tish Harrison Warren. Chapter One: Waking   There’s a sticker on the console of my car; it reads, Perhaps you were born for such a day as this. Pulled, a bit clumsily, from the Old Testament book of Esther – with the sticker-writer’s reinterpretation of inspirational soundbite meaning – this one-liner is supposed to make me think that this day might be...

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I’ve been retired just over 18 months. For a couple of years before I retired I started thinking and planning how I would spend my days in retirement. Rather than an end of my career I viewed it as the beginning of a new career, of what I was intended to do in this life, of finally fulfilling my purpose in life. My plans included starting every day with celebration of a new day; daily exercise, meditation, reading more than I had time...

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Do I believe this? Did the community of Creation, the Trinity, God, make this day? What does it mean that this day, this very day, was made by the God? How am I to respond to this? When I awake, I rarely am thinking that the Lord made this day. Throughout my day, it is not a thought that comes into my mind. So do I believe it? To be honest, I don’t know.  I look around and see pain. I live in pain, despair…hopelessness....

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Easter is a waking up. How do you wake up an Easter people? When I was a child, my father would sometimes wake us up with an Easter song. It is called ‘Up From The Grave He Arose” and it still brings a smile to my face when I think about it. This came to my mind as we were picking songs from Easter. We did not choose this song but it is always in the back of my mind. It became even more relevant when I started reading...

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It is a very interesting perspective from the ancient Jewish tradition of treating Sundown as a pause to the beginning of a new day. Sundown is a beautiful time to stop. Stop work, unplug, sit with God and ask “How shall we spend the next 24 hours?” One sure way to restful sleep is knowing that in the morning I can hit the ground running. Sundown is a time of discernment, when I ponder consequences and shift my priorities. It’s making...

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