Sacred Everyday

Reading through ‘The Liturgy of the Ordinary’ as a congregation.


A few months after my beloved grandfather died in 1975 I had a dream where I saw Jesus. I spent the next several years looking for people with whom I could explore my dream.  What I encountered was one of two reactions: people either nodded, said “Uh huh” and slowly backed away, or they got excited and proceed to tell me that I had met the real, literal Jesus and told me I had to accept him as my personal saviour to insure my...

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I recently finished reading The Count of Monte Cristo, an insanely long, intricately plotted tome of a book swelling with revenge and pain, drama and swashbuckling, unexpected softness and love. If I had to tell you the theme of the eleven-hundred-some-odd pages, it would be the three words Edmond Dantes (aka the count) speaks, as the story comes to a close, to encourage the young man he loves as a son: “Wait and hope.” Tish echoes...

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It’s about the who, what, where, and why of Time, otherwise known as the Here and Now. Like Gulliver I too could be accused by the Lilliputians of idolizing my watch. Now it displays not only the time but my Calendar and my sacred To Do List and that’s even better. My dad’s big advice was “Plan your work then work your plan”  so I was delighted to discover Ember Days: a Christian practice of setting aside time during the Equinox and...

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In this chapter of Liturgy of the Ordinary, Tish Harrison Warren writes about the ways of waiting by using traffic as an illustration. She says how, when we’re stuck in traffic on I-5 or 217, we are best reflecting our embodiment as people of faith—we’re on a journey to somewhere, with no control over God’s time. I hated that metaphor for the accuracy of it. That’s not just because I don’t like traffic (does anyone really?). It...

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A week in the woods is good for my soul. I look forward to my annual May camping trip and this year did not disappoint. This year had an extra interesting wrinkle. The Sunday before I left on the trip, I gave a short homily about email entitled, “too much of a good thing”. (It was the topic in our book series Sacred Everyday based Liturgy of the Ordinary).   I also did something for the first time ever: I set an...

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It was late spring last year, around this time maybe, and I happened to be at one of those proverbial crossroads in life. If we can stay in metaphor-land for a minute, I had limped and scratched and scrabbled my way to that crossroads and l couldn’t seem to make it any further but plopped down in the dust with the contents of my backpack splayed all around. I didn’t know at all how to pick up and keep moving so I sat there still,...

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I don’t know what it is about the season of life that I feel is just beginning to blossom before me, but I feel unusually drawn to a sarcastic and seemingly nihilistic outlook to much of life. The odd thing about this, is that I feel like feeling this is truer to myself, than the me that tries to be hopeful, the me that tries to do what is expected. The issue for me in this time, is that I hear voices all around saying sarcasm and...

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I was six in 1960 when my baby was born. Oops! I mean when my mother’s baby was born. I am told that I wanted to “take over”. Remembering back as far as I can, I hear a little girl responding, “Someone has to”. My parents were never fully organized for a brood of five. Mom had been given responsibility for all our domestic needs, was poor to delegate and was co-owner of an ever growing hoard of stuff. It was chaos. Dad worked all day...

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This week’s chapter about email, blessing, and sending reminded me of my favorite saint and mystic—Brother Lawrence. Born in the seventeenth century in France, Brother Lawrence was a Benedictine monk who lived and worked in a monastery in the kitchen and as a sandal maker for most of his life after sustaining an injury in the Thirty Years War. The main theme in his life was practicing the presence of God. This means that in whatever...

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email.   Finally a subject I am a verified consultant level expert on — I have written articles and taught classes on managing your Inbox effectively.  But, Tish Harrison Warren is one of the many people who would find my advice and counsel less than helpful.  Her chapter on how she finds it unpleasant when opening her Inbox speaks to a growing sense of helplessness in a flood of technology sent to rob us of our efficacy, our...

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